Tag Archives: inspiration

A Personal Angel Story

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Three weeks ago, on a beautiful summer evening, my 12 year old son went to play capture-the-flag with all the neighborhood boys.  No sooner had they started the game, my son ran full speed and tripped over a small wall along the driveway.  The boys’ faces when they came to tell me confirmed that the injury was more than just a scrape.

As I arrived on the scene, I could see my son’s bloody face and he was writhing in pain.  My neighbor had already called 911 and was steadily holding my son’s arm with an ice pack — more likely to protect him from seeing his broken bone and puncture wound than to prevent swelling.  When he pulled back the ice pack to show me where the bone had pierced through the skin, I thought I would be sick to my stomach.

I knew immediately that I should be sending Reiki to my son.  I knew that this is what Reiki was all about — no special equipment, no special medical training needed! I could calm him down and medical personnel could do their thing.  Perfect!

NOT.

On the exterior I was determined to remain calm so that my son could not see my fear.  I instinctively kept touching him to comfort him.  On the inside, my mind was racing and frantic.  The police and EMTs were asking me questions.  Neighbors were offering help.  Some of the boys who saw what happened were crying.  My son was crying, screaming, squirming and asking questions I couldn’t bear to answer.   It was all just too much.

When they opened the ambulance doors to lift my son inside, I tried to fill the ambulance with Reiki by drawing the symbols in my mind.  But, I was simply not calm or centered.  Frustrated, I thought things would be better inside the ambulance with the doors closed and with fewer people watching. However, my son was still in excruciating pain and I was unable to bring my thoughts to Reiki.  Feeling desperate and afraid, with my hands holding on my son’s “good” arm, I lowered my head and begged – BEGGED – ArchAngel Raphael to please come and send his healing.  I couldn’t do it.  I needed extreme help.

After a moment, I looked up and saw 111 on the monitor for my son’s heart rate and blood pressure.  111 is a fantastic angel number!  I knew right then that things would be okay.  Seeing that number at that exact moment brought me the tiny bit of hope that I needed.

Has everything been perfect and blissful since my 111 sighting? Certainly not!  I knew, and still know, that we have a tough road ahead.  The bumps along the way are here for a reason and I have to believe there is a greater learning experience I just don’t understand at the moment.  I still get signs and numbers from above and they have definitely kept me going.

So what are the “take aways” for you from this story?

1) Always ask the angels for help.  Be open to the signs  — repeated numbers, coins, feathers, coincidences that seem too good to be true, or special song lyrics.

2) Reiki works.   I know it does, but I was too attached to the outcome in this case (hello ego!).  When my son was in surgery, I was able to email my Reiki friends and ask for their help and healing.  I had to let go of my “I should do Reiki!” and let others take over.

3) ArchAngel Raphael is the angel of healing.  His color is green.  If you want to send prayers and healing to someone, imagine them basking in green light and ask ArchAngel Raphael for help.

Thanks for listening to my story.  ❤

Blind Obedience

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The other day I spoke of two influential TED talks.  Here is just one more to add to the list.  I wanted to write about it separately because it has a slightly different message, because I wanted to add in Elizabeth Gilbert’s comments, and because this is the story of a teenage girl who has already lived an extraordinary life.

Do you remember Malala Yousafzai?  In 2009, Malala was writing under a pseudonym for the BBC as she described her life in the Swat Valley of Pakistan under Taliban rule.  At the time she was 11 or 12 years old.  She was later in a New York Times documentary and her advocacy for girls education continued to garner attention. In 2012, she was shot in the head by a Taliban member on her way home from school.  The international outcry thrust her immediately into the spotlight.  She was nominated and awarded several prizes for her bravery and advocacy.  She wrote a book, spoke at the United Nations, met with presidents and heads of states and has been nominated twice for the Nobel Peace Prize.  This year, she will be just 17 years old.

Credit goes to Malala’s parents and her father in particular. The way she was raised defies many strong Pakastani and Muslim traditions regarding girls.  Her father Ziauddin Yousafzai spoke March 17th in Vancouver at TED2014.  I am copying Elizabeth Gilbert’s Facebook post directly because she writes so beautifully about what he said.  (Elizabeth Gilbert is best known as the author of Eat, Pray, Love and had her own TED talk this year.)

From Elizabeth Gilbert:

“UNLEARN THE LESSON OF OBEDIENCE.”

Last night at the TED conference, I wept while listening to Ziauddin Yousafzai speak about his daughter, Malala.

You have have heard of Malala Yousafzai. She is the brave young Pakistani girl who was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman for speaking up on behalf of education for girls.

Her father began his extraordinary speech by saying that in tribal and patriarchal societies, a man is known by his sons. “But I am one of the few fathers who is known by my daughter,” he said. “And I am proud of that.”

He spoke about how, in rural Pakistan, when a girl is born, it is never cause for celebration, but rather shame. As she grows up, she is taught only one virtue: Obedience.

Yousafzai refused to follow suit. He celebrated his daughter from the day she was born, and wrote her name in the family tree — a 300 year-old document that had never mentioned a female. He put Malala in school — not only so that she could know her own potential through education, but also for the mere political defiance of writing his daughter’s name on an enrollment form, thus signaling her very existence as a human being. (He had never seen the names of any of his 5 sisters on any document whatsoever; they simply did not exist within their own country.)

And most of all he said, “I taught her to unlearn the lesson of obedience.”

Which was such a shocking transgression that a Taliban gunman shot her for it. (I always think it’s particularly telling that she was shot in the head — shot in the MIND. Anything to shut down that female brain.)

She survived, famously, and still fights for education for girls. (She spoke last night to us from a video feed — she couldn’t come to the conference because she’s in SCHOOL — and she dazzled.)

This girl is extraordinary; this father is extraordinary.

He finished his speech by saying that people always ask him what he did to make Malala into such a strong warrior. He says it’s not what he did; it’s what he DIDN’T do: “I didn’t clip her wings.”

I was so honored and emotional to be there last night to hear this, and wanted to share it with you all.

Unlearn your obedience, women.

Teach your girls to unlearn their obedience.

And let a star shine in the crown of this father, and all parents, who guide their daughters to grow strong.

Onward,
LG

Unlearn Obedience.  My goodness!  How many times do we blindly follow the herd without even thinking?  Certainly, rules have their place and keep our society safe and sound.  I have always been a rule follower in order to be the “good girl.”  However, after reading Anatomy of the Spirit by Carolyn Myss and after seeing this particular story, I can’t help but think that many times, in order to experience soul growth, it is necessary to break away from our “tribe” and the strong hold it has on our being.  Consciously being aware of our cultural background and upbringing is important, but being able to stand up for our own true Selves is more empowering spiritually.  I am not saying that you should blatantly disobey all rules or disrespect your family.  What I am saying is that when you consciously know, deep in your heart, who you are and what is important to you and what you stand for, then you are not afraid to stand up for your Self, despite what may be going on around you.

Are there any rules or cultural norms that you believe are holding you back?  Can you acknowledge them and still be true to your Self?  It’s not easy.  Many times, it may take all of your inner strength to stand up for yourself.  Maybe not Malala-get-shot-in-the-head-international-spotlight courage, but courage none-the-less.

Peace.

Are You Limiting Yourself?

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Yesterday I came across two wonderful TED talks which were very similar in nature even though they came to me through different sources.  Are you familiar with TED?  “TED is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less).”  The videos are thought provoking and the perfect length for today’s short attention span.

The two videos that I came across yesterday had the same theme: do not set limitations for yourself.

The first video features Maysoon Zayid and it’s entitled “I got 99 problems…and palsy is just one.”  I don’t want to even tell you what it’s about because she is so HYSTERICAL in her delivery.  Let’s just say that Zayid’s cerebral palsy, her Pakistani background, and her Muslim upbringing ain’t holdin’ this lady back from pursuing her acting dreams or any of her other ambitious endeavors.  Please watch to the very end when she dedicates her speech, because I just found it so heartwarming.

The second TED talk I came across is written in blog form (for some reason I could not find the video link).  It’s called “Misdeeds Do Not Define You”  about Shaka Senghor.  This is a man who spent 20 years behind bars for murder, 7 of those years in solitary confinement.  He is now an MIT Media Lab Director’s Fellow, a BMe award recipient, an author, a speaker, an influential force in Detroit.  How did a murderer go from being so angry to being so positively influential?  He stopped blaming others.  He took a look deep down inside and he KNEW in his heart that this was not who he was at his core.  I give him so much credit for turning his life around.  He is not letting his history define who he is today.  He could so easily be angry.  He could so easily blame his upbringing and circumstances.  He could so easily go back to his old ways.  But, he doesn’t.  He consciously chooses a different path every day.

Are you setting limitations for yourself without even realizing it?  If you are not happy in your current situation, are you able to change your story?  I believe the answer is always yes.  We always have choices.  BUT, it takes a conscious effort.  Hopefully these videos provide a little inspiration.

Peace.